Teahouses & Trekking Lodges in Nepal

Teahouse Rolwaling Trek Travel Information Nepal

Teahouses & Trekking Lodges in Nepal

Thanks to the network of lodges (teahouses) operating throughout Nepal, it is possible to do many treks without taking your own camping gear or food. Ultra-minimalist trekkers can easily make do with little more than a day pack.  Typically, lodges have rooms with two basic single beds.  There is usually a central dining area with a stove or some other form of heat.  There is typically no heat in in the rooms, so most trekkers carry their own sleeping bags or hire porters to carry them.  Bathrooms are also shared, although some lodges in the Everest Base Camp Region and the Annapurna Region have rooms with attached bathrooms.

The business model for lodges is to make most of their money off of the food, so you are generally required to eat in the lodge where you stay.  The room charges are usually minimal compared with the price of food and beverages. Budget the equivalent of $25-$30 per day per person on food and lodging. Also, expect to spend a little more on the most popular trails and a little less on the least popular trails.  The prices also increase the further up the trail you get, and the further away from a road head.

The quality the lodges vary depending roughly on the popularity of the trek.

Shops

Lodges usually have small shops where you can buy snacks, toilet paper, and other odds and ends.  Prices will obviously be higher than what you’d  pay in Kathmandu.

Small teahouse shop on Rolwaling Trek
Small teahouse shop on Rolwaling Trek

Everest Base Camp and Gokyo Treks

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It is no surprise that with the long history of climbing expeditions and trekking, this region has some of the most comfortable lodges in Nepal.  In Namche Bazaar, there are lodges that are more like hotels than trekking lodges and some with attached hot water showers and bathrooms.  This is also where you will pay more for more comfortable rooms. You are not always required to eat in your lodge, but make sure this is understood when you negotiate the price at the beginning.  Higher up, the lodges get more basic but are still pretty good quality.  During high season, there can be a shortage of rooms at Lobuche and Gorak Shep.  You will always be able to find a roof over your head but if you arrive late you may find you will need to sleep in the dining area.  It pays to get started early, and if you have a porter send them ahead to reserve a room.  Unfortunately, calling ahead and booking is not reliable as lodge owners generally allocate rooms on first come first serve basis except for large groups from repeat business tour operators.

Everest Lodges at a Glance

  • Price: above average (closer to $30 per day for food & lodging but frugal trekkers could still manage $25)
  • Quality: high
  • Food: extensive menus
  • Room supply: Lobuche & Gorak Shep have occasional room supply issues
View of Everest from room in a lodge in Dingboche. After a long day of walking kick up your feet grab a beer and enjoy the view.

Annapurna Circuit

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The other trekking destination with a long history of trekking in Nepal, like the Everest region the lodges in this region are very well equipped.  Many have solar hot water showers. With the increase of roads in the region it has also become easier to get supplies.  There are plenty of rooms these days so it is unlikely you would have a problem finding a room at any of the locations along the trek.

Room at the Kalopani Guest House Room at the Kalopani Guest House along the Annapurna Circuit (photo credit: John Pavelka)

 

Annapurna Circuit Lodges at a Glance

  • Price: average (about $25 per day for food and lodging)
  • Quality: high
  • Food: extensive menus
  • Room supply: usually enough

 

Annapurna Sanctuary (Base Camp) Trek

Another longtime favorite trekking destination this trek also has very high quality lodges, however because of its popularity and because it’s an out and back trek lodges can get very busy during the high season.  The lodges at Annapurna Base Camp (ABC) often fill up during peak season (October-November).

Annapurna Sanctuary (Base Camp) Lodges at a Glance

  • Price: average (about $25 per day for food and lodging)
  • Quality: high
  • Food: extensive menus
  • Room supply: Rooms can fill up during peak season especially at ABC

 

Poon Hill Trek

Probably the most popular short trek in Nepal.  The lodges are of high quality and there are lots of them however during high season there are also lots of trekkers so lodges can fill up during peak season (October-November).

Poon Hill Lodges at a Glance

  • Price: average (about $25 per day for food and lodging)
  • Quality: high
  • Food: extensive menus
  • Room supply: Rooms can fill up during peak season especially at Ghorepani.

 

 

Langtang Valley and Gosaikunda Treks

The Langtang region was decimated by the 2015 Earthquake, however the lodges have been rebuilt and the trekking industry which is the primary economy of the region is back, and the lodges have been rebuilt.

Langtang Lodges at a Glance

  • Price: average (about $25 per day for food and lodging)
  • Quality: high
  • Food: extensive menus
  • Room supply: usually enough

 

Around Manaslu Trek

This trek has been gaining popularity faster than the lodge infrastructure has kept up.  With the increased roads along the Annapurna Circuit, Around Manaslu is quickly becoming the regions new “epic trek.”  The lodges are generally quite a bit more basic than you find in the Annapurna region.  Despite the lacking amenities the prices are not much cheaper than they are on the Annapurna Circuit.  If you are trekking in peak season you may not have to be content with lesser lodges as some of the ‘best’ lodges may be booked up with large high paying large international groups. As always it pays to get on the trail early arriving early is the best way to secure a good room.

Manaslu Lodges at a Glance

  • Price: average (about $25 per day for food and lodging)
  • Quality: medium
  • Food: menus vary in extent and quality
  • Room supply: can be tight during peak season at the most desirable lodges

 

Lodge Kitchen

Tsum Valley

This off the beaten track trek is an offshoot of the Around Manaslu Trek.  While the Around Manaslu trek’s popularity is increasing this region still feels remote and sees far fewer trekkers.  The ‘lodges’ in this region feel more like homestays or at times basic rooms in monasteries.  The food is basic, expect dhal bat (lentils and rice) or noodles, outhouses are the only toilets, and some places do not have running water.

 

Tsum Valley Accommodation at a Glance

  • Price: below average about $20 per day for food and lodging
  • Quality: basic (homestays)
  • Food: basic
  • Room supply: basic rooms are usually available
A very basic outhouse toilet.

 

Rolwaling Valley

This off the beaten track region of the Gaurishankar Conservation Area is most often used by camping expeditions entering the Khumbu (Everest Region) via the mountaineering pass, Tashi Laptsa.  It is also a great off the beaten track teahouse trekking destination in its own right.  Perhaps because many of the groups that pass this way camp and because it’s still a rather little known as trekking destination, the lodges are basic, with all of the lodges having outhouse style toilets.  There are only one or two lodges at each overnight spot but since there are usually very few trekkers on the trail there is usually plenty of available rooms during all seasons.  There is also a basic shelter at Yalung Ri Base Camp but no one staying there permanently.

Sign advertising a bucket hot shower at a lodge in the Rolwaling Valley

Rolwaling Accommodation at a Glance

  • Price: below average about $20 per day for food and lodging
  • Quality: medium to basic
  • Food: limited menus
  • Room supply: rooms are usually available despite few lodges.
Micah Hanson

Micah (founder of Sherpana) is a PhD engineer with a passion for adventure, travel, and problem solving. After spending nearly 7 years living out of a backpack traveling, photographing, and trekking, in 2016 he started Sherpana with the help and support of his good friend Kili Sherpa as a way to provide better way for local guides and trekkers to get together.